Police Auction Off Items Including Luxury Swiss Fake Rolex Watches UK And A Dingy On eBay – And Make Thousands

Expensive gold UK Rolex replica watches online, a Louis Vuitton scarf and a search and rescue boat were among the bizarre collection of things sold by Leicestershire Police on eBay last year, raising more than £120,000 for the force and criminal justice system in 2021.

And so far this year, a further £50,000 worth of items have gone on the site, which sells things including unwanted police equipment and valuables confiscated from criminals. Stolen Swiss made Rolex super clone watches that are never claimed can also end up on the site.

The dinghy, previously used by Leicestershire Search and Rescue, was sold on the site for more than £1,200. That money will be passed back to the search and rescue team to continue their work alongside the force.

Leicestershire Police was the first force in the country to use the eBay site to auction property in this way, including old police vehicles and all kinds of goods seized under the Proceeds of Crime Act. The Act means judges can order the seizure of money made from criminal enterprises – or the equivalent in property.

Among the big sales in 2021 was 18ct rose gold best Rolex fake watches, which sold for more than £22,000. A Moncler jacket was sold for £270 and a Louis Vuitton scarf and beanie hat was sold for £365. All of these items were seized under the Proceeds of Crime Act (POCA).

Paul Wenlock from the force’s Economic Crime Unit, said: “This site is hugely beneficial for us in generating income from property which would just lie in storage or, over time, be destroyed. Since 2017, more than £900,000 has been generated through items auctioned on the site.

“The perfect replica Rolex watches was one of the most expensive items we sold on the site in that period. As well as the AAA top Rolex copy watches, designer clothing was among the variety of items which were forfeited under POCA and auctioned on eBay in the last year.

“Income generated from the sales of POCA items is submitted to the Home Office who then return a percentage of the money to the force which is shared between the police, victims, courts and the criminal justice system. The remaining income from the sale of other items remains with the force.”

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